In Support Of Police Associations And Community Events

I’ve been hard on cops a couple of times recently. But this time, I’m coming out in support of something that I think has been given way too much time and coverage.

In the Toronto Star today, there’s an editorial entitled “Poor Tool For Police,” a criticism of fund raising that some police associations have embarked upon.

Even the Canadian Civil Liberties Association is getting involved in this one, as is Toronto Chief Fantino. What’s the problem? Well, the editorialist states, “But for some, a telemarketer’s pitch might cause real dread.”

Give me a break. Are these guys asking for money to go into the coffers of the Police Association? Nope. At least that’s not what happened when I received a call from a telemarketer on behalf of the Orangeville Police Association.

Did I feel intimidated? Nope. Not one bit. Should an immigrant from a totalitarian country feel intimidated? I don’t see how.

Here’s what happened. I get a phone call from someone advising me that he’s calling on behalf of the Orangeville Police Association. They’re looking for support for a charity event – a hockey game in town, where the cops are going to lace on skates and play against some NHL Oldtimers.

“Would you care to help out, Mr. Scott? The benefits are going to [I can’t remember which charity it was, but a good one I’d support to do with kids]”

“You bet! I’d love to help out, and I think its great the local cops are getting involved in something like this,” I responded. “Who are the NHL oldtimers that are coming to town?”

The telemarketer rhymed off a bunch of names I recognized – and I thought, “Wow! That’s cool that these guys are going to be in Orangeville.” Should be a fun time had by all.

What would be really cool is if the cops would go out and play against the local rep hockey team, and let the lads hit them a few times with some hard body checks. And after the game, hang out with them for a bit.

This is the sort of thing cops SHOULD be doing more of. And I support this 100%. And if some poor immigrant feels intimidated, well.. it’s a good way for him to learn that in this country, such community events are considered a good thing – and he/she can learn a bit more about freedom and how citizens in a supposed free country are able to give and help the community.

Sure, it might be tough on them at first. But what’s the big deal? It’s a good learning experience. And as another Toronto Star editorial recently stated, “The only thing to fear is fear itself.”

Get on the real issues. Like bad cops ruining people’s lives. Give me a break with this one though. Police Associations and their hired telemarketers are welcome to call me any time they like to ask for support for community events. I may not always be able to oblige them if my budget is blown. But to discourage cops from raising money for charity through really cool community events is just plain ridiculous.

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